Review: Question Quest The Language Card Game

We’ve been trying out Question Quest for the last few weeks at Cambridge English.

question quest

 

We love AGO, the UNO-like simple English question game, and David Lisgo’s Switchit card games.

When I saw Question Quest’s website I was extremely interested. It seemed like it would appeal to our teenage learners and complement our existing card games so I ordered a copy immediately.

Once it arrived I was impressed with the production values. The game is very attractive, with incredible artwork, quality materials, and a sturdy box.

The good

  • The artwork is beautiful and very appealing to Japanese teenagers
  • The game includes English and Japanese instructions
  • The materials are high-quality and pretty sturdy
  • The language covered is very appropriate for our students
  • Cards include example sentences to help students
  • The gameplay is interesting and more skilled players are more likely to win
  • Students practice strategies such as asking for more information, asking a third party, and expressing their lack of understanding
  • Reasonably priced (1575 yen for over 100 cards)

The bad

  • The game as written takes a long time to play (probably 20-40 minutes), which was a bit long for us
  • It took a while for us to understand the rules, both teachers and students
  • Some of the example questions on the cards are a bit unintuitive

Overall

This is a very promising resource. We normally do some kind of game or activity in the last 5-10 minutes of class, so found that Question Quest did not quite fit in that time. However, we were able to adapt the game (teacher asks the questions to students, playing without the conversation strategy cards, etc.) to fit the shorter time.

We also took some time and played some full games. Lots of fun and the students are practicing useful conversational gambits.

Overall I recommend Question Quest to teachers of teenage or young adult students (although it would certainly work with the right group of adults too). It’s an attractive and versatile resource. A single pack is a very reasonable investment for a small classroom: teachers with larger classes would need one set for each group of up to 4-6 players.

Has anyone else tried this game?

3 Dec 2013, 3:41pm
curriculum materials
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5 comments

Collaboration Arithmetic

Recently I have been working a lot with one of my colleagues at my university.

1 plus 1

A lot of the time, working with others is a drag on effectiveness. Things take longer to get done, you need to agree on what to do, people don’t do their share. It tends to be 1+1 ends up being less than two, and for every person you add to the mix the final number gets lower and lower. After a certain point the results drop to zero.

However, once in a while you end up with a team that works. Synergy occurs as your complementary skill sets allow you to do things that you couldn’t do by yourself.

In that rare situation, 1+1 ends up being 3 or 4 or 5.

We have a new project in the works, and I think you will like it. More details in 2014.

In the meantime, if you don’t have a copy of our ER Program Design Manual, why not order a free copy from our Center for Professional Development?

Have you ever had a synergistic collaboration?

Oxford Day 2013 video, slides, and writeup

I was extremely lucky to be invited to speak at the first Oxford Day in Japan this month.

oxford day workshop

I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but I really enjoyed the whole thing. 188 teachers attended, and there were nine presentations (five time slots). The venue was a very comfortable meeting space in Shibuya, and the provided coffee and sandwiches were excellent.

Most importantly for me, I had a fantastic group of teachers in my presentation who were very forgiving and asked me a bunch of questions at the end. Here is a copy of my slides in .pdf format and the video of the presentation is below:

131123 Maximising Input (slides in .pdf format)

If you have any questions please let me know in the comments, or send me an email to sendaiben@gmail.com.

Oxford Day 2013

I’m really pleased to be part of Oxford Day 2013, to be held in Tokyo on November 23rd.

oxford day 2013

You can see more information here.

My workshop is from 13:00 to 14:00:

Maximising input through extensive reading and listening resources (Room 2)
Teachers and learners all know that the way to get better at English is to get a lot of input (through extensive reading and listening) and practice (through speaking and writing). The hard part is actually doing that day in, day out. One important factor is whether learners can find content at their level that interests them. This 60-minute workshop will introduce a variety of resources, both online and off, suitable for all levels, as well as how to best introduce them to learners in a way that encourages and motivates.

It really is a great lineup, it’s free, and you even get a complimentary lunch 😉

Register here, and I hope to see you there.

Review: Life (4-skills series by Cengage)

After a long hiatus, a review. This textbook is for teenagers and adults.

Life series

Life is a 6-level, 4-skills series consisting of a student book, workbook, and teacher’s book at each level. The student book has a DVD with videos, and the teacher’s book contains two CDs with the class audio. The workbook also has a CD for listening-based homework. The series runs from Beginner (A1) to Advanced (C1).

First impression: Life is gorgeous. Cengage is really leveraging all those National Geographic photos they have access to, and it is working really well. If you are a Japan-based teacher you will probably be struck by how dense the book is -there is a lot on each page and much less white space than we are used to.  Someone described it as a ‘European-style’ textbook, as opposed to ‘Asian-style’.

The Good

  • This is a very attractive textbook. The design and production values are very high.
  • There is a lot of content. Each book has 12 units, each unit has 6 sections. We’ve been working through one section per class so far.
  • A really nice variety of topics and media (print. audio, video).
  • There is a lot of variety. Reading, grammar, vocabulary, and speaking exercises on almost every page.
  • The class audio is included in the teacher book. I like this idea a lot, rather than making us buy separate overpriced classroom CDs like many publishers do.
  • The website actually seems to have useful materials on it 🙂

The Bad

  • It’s expensive. All those production values come at a cost (EDIT: but there is a split edition I haven’t seen that  incorporates half of the student book and workbook together).
  • For Japanese students, it’s completely unbalanced. The grammar parts are way too easy, the reading/listening are too difficult.
  • The dense page layouts can be intimidating (just a first impression problem).

Overall

I really like the series so far. We’re three weeks in and the students like it and are challenged by it, and it’s a fairly intuitive textbook from the teacher’s point of view. We’ve been using the Intermediate level with our ‘advanced’ high school student eikaiwa class, so I’m looking forward to using some of the other levels in due course. Recommended.

Amazon.co.jp Link

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